College Radio Day Continues to Grow

College Radio Day Continues to Grow

College radio stations from all around the globe will come together on October 2 for the 2nd annual College Radio Day.

Rob Quicke, General Manager of WPSC FM at William Paterson University in New Jersey College dubbed last year’s  Radio Day as “a day when all college radio stations come together.”

“Last year we knew that the next College Radio Day in 2012 was going to be international because we received several emails from stations around the world,” Quicke said. “We alre ady have over 500 stations in 18 countries.”

Quicke said he first got the idea for College Radio Day in 2010 after watching The Social Network, a movie about the popular social media site Facebook.

“I remember watching The Social Network film in December 2010 and wondering whether there was an idea that could bring college radio together and go ‘viral’ the same way that Facebook took off,” Quicke said. “I woke up the next day with the idea of College Radio Day. I absolutely assumed that someone was already doing it – but was surprised after a bit of Googling that no one really had.”

Quicke began contacting college radio stations across the nation and Texas A&M University- Kingsville’s student-run station, KTAI FM 91.1, was one of them.

“We got an email from the founder, Rob Quicke, and decided to do it,” KTAI program director, Rami Garza said. “College Radio Day has brought national recognition to our small station.”

Quicke said he was just expecting 50 stations to get involved but his expectations were surpassed.

“As it happened, in a matter of months, over 360 college stations signed up to participate,” Quicke said. “The fact that so many stations came together for a day of unity for the very first College Radio Day surprised many people, including me.”

According to www.collegeradioday.com, the aim of College Radio Day is to raise a greater, international awareness of the many college and high school radio stations that operate around the world by encouraging people who would not normally listen to college radio to do so on this day.

“It’s the day that we all come together because there are stations out there that are getting bought out by big companies, and we are fortunate enough to be an asset to the university,” Garza said.

After the Inaugural College Radio Day, KTAI FM won the Spirit of College Radio Day Award and received a proclamation from Governor Rick Perry declaring October 2 College Radio Day statewide.

“I submitted the application for the proclamation in which I included all of the 16 stations in the state of Texas that are participating,” promotions manager Danny Carranza said.

Furthermore, the first ever College Radio Day Album will be released on October 2, the same day as its namesake event.

The album is a 2-disc CD with songs recorded only college stations by unsigned artists, and songs by well-known artists, like The Civil Wars, who support college radio.

“All proceeds will go to a new fund administered by College Radio Day, which will offer financial grants to college radio stations seeking help to buy new or repair existing equipment, putting on promotional events and also helping in other ways,” Quicke said.

Quicke’s intention with College Radio Day is to bring recognition and listenership to college radio stations all over the world.

“College radio is sorely undervalued and often overlooked by mainstream culture, so it was about time that we came together, got noticed and, hopefully, increased listenership and support for college and high school radio stations,” Quicke said.

For more information about College Radio Day visit www.collegeradioday.com or www.tamuk/ktai.

Alejandra Garza
Associate Editor