Art exhibit to open this week

Art exhibit to open this week

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By: Frank Garza

Displaying the talent of the faculty in the university’s art program and honoring two longtime employees who retired this semester is the purpose of the Art, Communications and Theatre Departments first art exhibit of the season.

Title “Art 2011: Faculty Exhibition,” the exhibit will run through Sept. 9 in the Ben Bailey Art Gallery in the Art Building. On Sept. 7, there will be a reception honor retiring Art Professor Dr. Richard “Doc” Scherpereel and administrative assistant Delia Hale. Scherpereel had more than 40 years experience with the university’s art program and also served as department chair.

Organized by Professor Jesus de la Rosa, the primary purpose for this art exhibit was to honor the retirement of  Scherpereel and allow for the art professors to display their creations. Since this is the first faculty exhibit in a long while, De le Rosa is also showcasing the artwork of two retired professors.

“I want people to see the work the faculty is dedicated to. Besides teaching, we all have a love for practicing the arts. The theme for this month’s exhibition is a celebration of the faculty as practicing artists,” De la Rosa explained.

The reception for the gallery will be on Sept. 7 at 6 p.m. The gallery is open to students, faculty, and the community of Kingsville as a whole. Admission is free.

“It’s very important for the art students to be exposed to this. They don’t have the resources to see art museums. As for the community, it’s cultural. We know how important culture is,” De la Rosa said.

Each piece of art in the exhibit has a story, he said.

De la Rosa’s Smoking Mountain, for example, symbolizes the concerns he had growing up in the Texas and Mexico borderlands where cultures, languages, and identities conflict.

Charles Wissinger, one of the professors showcasing his artwork, said, “One of the main reasons I love this art exhibit is because it gives the students a chance to see our work. We’re their role models. The other reason is that there aren’t any opportunities to see art otherwise.”

Wissinger explained that he was lucky enough to travel frequently, so he incorporates different cultures into his artwork. One of his drawings, titled Migraine, expressed an emotion. Not only is art about portraying objects, he said, but it is also able to express feelings.

James Allen, an aspiring art major, said, “It’s pretty inspiring to see this work. They started out just like us. Some kids just don’t appreciate the knowledge that they’re passing down to us. The professors will do their best to help us succeed. And for the people not majoring in art, it’s still nice to stop and admire it.”

Mark Molina
Staff Writer