Rangel’s statue is good luck

Rangel’s statue is good luck

In a moment of frustration and fury, he shoves all his books and notes off the desk. As he puts his head down, there is a heavy thud on the ground. The papers are scattered all across the floor, the books are open at odd angles, and he is trying not to sob.
“I’m screwed,” he says. Completely, one hundred percent screwed. Desperate for help, he goes out for a walk. He heard from a friend that people place pennies by the Irma Lerma Statue for good luck. Although he was skeptical, he had no other alternative at this point.
“Anything to pass this test. I need this A,” he says. He arrives at the statue, places a penny down, and then reluctantly goes off to take his test. Miraculously, impossibly, it works. The day he received his score, he couldn’t believe it. It was an “A”.
Since early February, possibly even earlier, pennies have started appearing by the feet of the Irma Lerma Rangel statue in front of the Texas A&M Health Science Center’s College of Pharmacy (COP). The reason, says Brady McNulty, a student at the COP, is almost purely for good luck on an exam.
“It caught my eye as I was walking up to the building. My class was the only one that had a test that morning,” McNulty said.
“I’ve dropped a penny or two there. We have a particularly difficult series of courses, so any time I have an exam in those courses, I’ll take all the luck I can get,” McNulty said.
It works every time, or it did, back when Pharmacy student Justin Redding would put pennies down by the feet of the Sul Ross statue when he attended Texas A&M–College Station.
“We have a lot of proud Aggies at the COP, and I’m one of them. I’m sure this was inspired by the Aggie tradition of placing pennies at the feet of the Sul Ross statue back at College Station,” Redding said.
Up at College Station, the tradition of placing pennies at the feet of the Sul Ross statue is very popular, said Bradley Thompson, a TAMU student.
“Oh yeah, it’s very popular. And you don’t just find pennies. Last year, there was a bra on the statue. You usually get pennies throughout the school year, but when finals come around, a lot of other stuff gets put on the statue,” Thompson said.
The COP is composed of students with degrees from various institutions. As a result, the student body there does not have a strong identity. Some students probably wanted to change that, and give the school some character, which is a good thing, said McNulty.
“I’m really looking forward to our school further establishing its own identity. I would have loved to be a Javelina pharmacy student, or likewise an Aggie pharmacy student. Since that can’t happen, I guess I’ll just have to be something in between,” McNulty said.

Frank Garza
Editor-in-Chief

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