Complex Cannibis Considerations

Complex Cannibis Considerations

It’s nothing new: People have been arguing for and against the decriminalization or legalization of marijuana for decades. Proponents have cited the economic advantages that could possibly provide a boost to the national, and quite possibly, world economy.
According to recent polls by the group Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), more people in the United States are, “in favor of the legalization of marijuana to defund cartels and gangs, lower incarceration and arrest rates.”
Now, renowned Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes has come out and said that decriminalizing drugs in Mexico could save that country. Fuentes claims that decriminalization is the only way to end the violence that has plagued Mexico and has claimed the lives of close to 50,000 men, women and children.
Perhaps he has a point.
Ten years ago, Portugal made all drugs legal in a desperate attempt to slow down the massive spread of HIV/AIDS by intravenous drug users. Now Portugal finds itself with the lowest rates of marijuana usage in people over the age of 15, about 10 percent of the total population at that age. Rates of new HIV infections have dropped significantly, the number of those seeking treatment has risen and money on law enforcement has allowed for increased funding of drug-free treatment as well.
Let’s just say for a second that the Mexican government takes what Fuentes says and runs with it. What might happen?
Mexico’s biggest natural resource, aside from crude oil, is marijuana. Decriminalization could create a potential for more jobs for Mexico’s impoverished. Taxation could increase capital for a struggling nation that leaves its’ citizens no other choice than to leave in search of a better life across the border. Violence could come to a virtual standstill since cartels would have no claim to any territory belonging to the people. Tourism would increase because, let’s face it, Americans love to get high. And what better high is there than one without any repercussions? We could open up the borders and be happy little baked campers dancing around a giant bonfire on the beaches of Playa de Carmen!
Unfortunately, there are three factions that will keep this from happening: The Mexican drug cartels, the Mexican government, and the United States government.
The cartels will do anything to avoid this eventuality in order to maintain total control over the drug trade. The Mexican government is utterly impotent, and their war on drugs is nothing more than a glorified PR campaign aimed at a terrified and struggling populace.
Finally, the United States profits from prisons that are currently at maximum capacity due to drug crimes. Why kill that particular cash cow when you can milk it from now until the end of time?
This is not to mention that the drug cartels and Mexican law enforcement buy arms from across our border. Decriminalization would take away the demand for increased protection from rival factions and political entities that currently utilize a show of arms that would make John Rambo wet his pants.
Decriminalization is kind of like nuclear disarmament; it only work if everyone agrees to do it at the same time. Everyone needs to get their heads out of their collective backsides, fight this war on drugs with the same goals, and finally take full control of this problem that continues to plague both sides of the border.

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