Fighting plagiarism with censorship

Fighting plagiarism with censorship

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To many students of the university, their internet access is their source of rapid information for studying, but it has the possibility of tempting some students into academic dishonesty, by committing plagiarism and copying somebody else’s work, a violation of university policy.
To keep the possibility of plagiarism at bay, University officials have taken measures to block and “censor” some websites, while some of the blocked websites are to prevent academic dishonesty, many pornography sites are blocked in the university’s internet system.
Many students, mostly males, are upset over their access to pornography being denied, but students like Kevin Castillo said “It’s not so much of the school blocking pornography, but them blocking websites makes it hard to find research we need for our courses or essays to make an adequate grade in class” Castillo also added “[the censoring] doesn’t let me acquire the sufficient research I doesn’t let me acquire the sufficient research I need, it stumps me in the learning process.”
While the intentions of the blocking are good, the University has blocked many sites that are essential to student research, one that came under fire was the blocking of Wikipedia.org, many high school students have plagiarized from Wikipedia, and while some got away with it, the university would not allow any affairs of that sort to happen on campus, thus blocking Wikipedia.
Many students cried out that Wikipedia has sources for the researching student to view so they can gather information direct from the site, rather than just taking what the Wikipedia authors had written on the page.
In the case of stopping the censorship, students sent a petition with a letter saying that students pay for the internet and that it was wrong of the authoritarians to censor websites without consulting the student body.
The Vice President of Student Affairs, along with University President Dr. Steven Tallant responded that certain sites are blocked for three reasons: firstly, to comply with state and federal laws, as some students may still be minors while attending, the university has taken the guessing game out of deciding whether or not each student is 18, and just blocked all adult and pornographic sites,
complying with federal laws. Secondly, to protect security at the university, with hackers such as Anonymous and Lulzraft running amuck on the internet, the university is taking any necessary precautions to prevent any attacks that may harm the school and disrupt the academic system.
Third, the university wishes to protect students, faculty, and staff against identity theft.
The blocking of sites is indeed justified, and is for the good of the student body, sites that are needed for purposes of the academia can be requested by contacting the professor whose class requires the blocked site and a pass around the block will be given to those who need to access the content.